Adelaide Sites

Bank of Adelaide

Bank of Adelaide
The corner part of this quietly dignified building was put up in 1880-81 for the Bank to the design of Wright, Reed and Beaver, architects. The western section with an entrance to Currie Street was added in 1940. It was later occupied by the Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) Bank. The ... Continue Reading »

Bickford Office and Warehouse

This was built in 1881 for W. & H. Bickford, wholesale druggists, whose business was conducted here. Architecturally it is one of the few example in Adelaide of a building of its period erected for a great business to combine an office and warehouse. The site is part of the ... Continue Reading »

Eagle Hotel

Eagle Hotel
This was built probably in 1867 on the site of the Eagle Tavern. The Eagle Tavern was opened in 1846 by a Mr Doran, who advertised that he was anxious to serve "families newly arrived in the colony and parties from the bush." The design of the veranda and balcony, in ... Continue Reading »

South Australian Brewing Company Building

South Australian Brewing Company Building
This building is of historical significance because of its association with the South Australian Brewing Company for which it was built in 1940-41 as the administrative headquarters. They were sited near the now demolished West End  brewery which moved to Southwark in 1980.The building is architecturally significant as a design ... Continue Reading »

Draper Memorial Church

Draper Memorial Church
This church on Gilbert Street, with its interesting Gothic spire, was designed for the Wesleyan Church in 1867 by James Cumming, architect. It was then called the Draper Memorial Church, after the Reverend D.J. Draper, who was drowned when the London sank in 1866. It was later known as the Apostolic Church.  The ... Continue Reading »

Botanic Hotel

Botanic Hotel
This was designed by Michael McMullen, architect, for R. Vaughan and built by J. Barry in 1876-7. The fine terrace of houses to the west (Botanic Chambers) with two storeys and a basement was contemporary and was designed by the same architect. The hotel is a little reminiscent of a ... Continue Reading »

Adelaide Gaol

Adelaide Gaol
Although established as a free colony in 1836 without convict labour, South Australia by 1840 had enough lawbreakers to warrant the erection of a secure gaol. Designs were therefore prepared by George Kingston and in 1840-41 the first section of a gaol, in the parklands adjacent to the corner of ... Continue Reading »

St Paul’s Rectory

St Paul’s Rectory
The rectory formed part of the complex of St Paul's Anglican church which also included a school house.  An architect for the rectory has not been identified, although the church was designed by James Cumming.  In 1969,Morgan and Gilbert observed of the rectory,  'This stone building with brick dressings is ... Continue Reading »

Convent of Mercy

Convent of Mercy
Completed in 1922 the Cunningham Memorial Chapel of the Convent of Mercy was built as a memorial to Mother Cecilia Cunningham's parents and is remarkable for its excellence of design and workmanship at a time when craft skills were still highly regarded. The richly detailed surfaces and finishes render this ... Continue Reading »

Advanced School for Girls

Advanced School for Girls
The Adelaide Girls' High School in Grote Street, Adelaide, was designed in Gothic style by E. J. Woods, architect, and built by Thos. Martin and Sons in 1873. It was used originally as a public school for boys and two classrooms were added in 1892, with further additions in 1900. It features ... Continue Reading »

Sturt Street Public School

The City Model School (Sturt Street) opened as a public school in 1883.  The building comprises two high gables and a smaller central one and is made of bluestone and brick. It now operates as the Sturt Street Community School.

Supreme Court

Supreme Court
Built in 1869 of Tea Tree Gully sandstone, from a design by the Colonial Architect R. G. Thomas with, it is believed, some assistance by William McMinn, it features a three-arched entrance, cast iron gates, and Ionic columns. The whole is topped by a balustraded parapet and a pediment under ... Continue Reading »

The University of Adelaide – Mitchell Building

The University of Adelaide – Mitchell Building
The Mitchell Building on North Terrace, the first building erected for the University of Adelaide, was designed by the Irish architect William McMinn and built by Brown and Thompson between 1879 and 1881.  With St Peter's Cathedral it is the best example in Adelaide of the Gothic Revival from the ... Continue Reading »

Adelaide Children’s Hospital – original building

Adelaide Children’s Hospital – original building
The Adelaide Children's Hospital was founded in 1876 by a group of charitable upper-class women under the guidance of Dr Alan Campbell, who had been a member of Adelaide's Board of Health since its inception in 1873. The first hospital building was designed by William McMinn, who probably ... Continue Reading »

Training School for Teachers

This building of accomplished Tudor design by the architect E.J. Woods, was erected in 1876 as the Training School for Teachers (or Pupil Teacher School).  In 1908 the School amalgamated with Advanced School for Girls and the Grote Street School to form Adelaide High School. The two storey building with its ... Continue Reading »

Yarabee House

Yarabee House
Historically this place is associated with the Adelaide Lunatic Asylum that operated for 40 years on a site that is now part of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens. The former residence which was built in 1866 for the Medical Officer of the Asylum East Lodge together with some walling and the ... Continue Reading »

Exploring Education

Exploring Education
Built from wood, stone or brick, the heritage sites included in this tour reveal the importance of education in South Australia's past. Visit the Mitchell Building on North Terrace, notable as the first building constructed for the University of Adelaide. Stroll past the Advanced School for Girls on Grote Street, a ... Continue Reading »

Politics, Power and Law

Politics, Power and Law
Adelaide’s heritage buildings reflect the fascinating development of South Australia from colony to State. From North Terrace to Victoria Square, see the sites along the way that reveal the important role of the city as the centre of administration, commerce and leadership in the State. Highlights include the original Legislative Council ... Continue Reading »

Adelaide Vintage Pubs

Adelaide Vintage Pubs
From corner to corner, the city streets are dotted with some of the oldest and best-known pubs and hotels in Adelaide. Highlights include the Newmarket Hotel on the corner of North and West Terrace, which has a famous connection with Colonel William Light and holds claim to establishing the South Australian ... Continue Reading »

Faith in the City

Faith in the City
Perhaps some of the most celebrated and significant heritage buildings of the city are those dedicated to worship and faith. Adelaide’s well-known reputation as the ‘city of churches’ is evidenced by the numerous and varied religious structures found throughout the city. The sites included in this tour are also examples of ... Continue Reading »

Crime and Mayhem

Crime and Mayhem
Though unique in its establishment as a free colony in Australia, South Australia is not without its colourful criminal past. The sites included in this tour represent the establishment of the state’s law and order, some dating back to the early days of the colony itself. Highlights include the Magistrates Court, ... Continue Reading »

Survivors from early Adelaide

Survivors from early Adelaide
The sites in this tour represent Adelaide's colonial past and stand as notable examples of the oldest built structures in the city. This tour includes some of the city's best-known public and private heritage buildings, and reveals how some narrowly escaped demolition! Highlights include Ayers House, named for the prominent South Australian ... Continue Reading »

Houses Great and Small

Houses Great and Small
This tour highlights the nineteenth century private residences found in the eastern side of the city, many which are significant for the particular architectural style they represent. Some are also notable for the well-known South Australians who called them home. Highlights include Rymill House, home to the Rymill family and an ... Continue Reading »